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5 Great Fonts for Commercial Signage

5 Great Fonts for Commercial Signage

With so much attention given to commercial signage’s context and message, seemingly small details such as which typeface is used can play a large role in conveying your message to consumers. As with many other design elements, there’s always a balance between form and function, but when done right, a typeface can leave a lasting impression.

There’s a good reason why a law firm, for example, most likely wouldn’t use Comic Sans font, but instead a classic, traditional font that conveys trust and reputation. Conversely, an ice cream parlour would just look boring if its commercial signage were all in TImes New Roman, for example.

Below are five great fonts to consider for commercial signage:

1. Baskerville

Is your business reliant on building trust and conveying an image of reputability and tradition? Boutiques, consultancy firms, and upscale hotels and restaurants have long used Baskerville for its 250 year old, traditional style that blends both elements of thick and thin lines which contrast and look elegant on larger commercial signs. Avoid using Baskerville for small lettering, however, as it may seem out of place on small printed text.

2. Didot

Luxurious, high-end glamour is well-exemplified in Didot, a refined and upper-class typeface that works well for high-end retailers and boutiques. It’s widely seen as an “expensive” font, so it can be seen as classy and traditional like Baskerville, but more appropriate for luxury brands and businesses catering to an affluent clientele.

3. Optima

Optima is a wonderful font that sits somewhere between a serif and a sans serif font in its initial appearance. Upon closer inspection, Optima is sans serif, meaning that its lettering doesn’t have little ticks or detailing around letters (think Arial or Verdana fonts).

Another important factor when it comes to commercial signage is scalability. Some fonts look great on small lettering, such as web copy (what you’re reading right now), whereas others look great when scaled up for large outdoor signage. Optima stands out for looking refined and great when scaled up or down, and it looks particularly good for law firms or consultancies where trust and reliability need to be conveyed.

4. Trajan

If you’ve ever seen an advert for films such as Titanic or Thor outside of the cinema, chances are Trajan was the font du jour for the poster’s designer. This all-caps font, named after a famous Roman emperor, exudes weight and gravity, anchoring in text and putting it front and centre. This font isn’t subtle, so use it sparingly when you really want to showcase your brand or message before anything else.

Note that Trajan is a serif (sometimes called Roman) font, meaning that little ticks and details can be found around the letters, adding a sense of traditionality and refinement.

5. Gill Sans

Sleek and modern Gill Sans looks great for most businesses since it’s so flexible. It provides both a contemporary touch as well as tradition, being used famously for the London Underground since the 1920s. Note that this font is quite bold, so expect your text to take centre stage of your signage and to be easily read with Gill Sans.

Go Graphics

There are so many fonts and typefaces available nowadays, and some look better than others depending on the goal and purpose of your business. Choose Go Graphics for quality designs incorporating typefaces, graphics, and all of the elements required to take your commercial signage to the next level.

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